BOOK-VIEWS.COM - https://book-views.com
A telling tale
https://book-views.com/articles/362/1/A-telling-tale-/Page1.html
Andrea Asay
I review books for http://Readthebook.com and various other publications. I am the Christian Perspectives Examiner for http://Examiner.com and I am currently working on my first novel.  
By Andrea Asay
Published on 02/24/2010
 
Curse of the Tahiera tells a story like no other. Wendy Gillissen tells us a tale of vast lands and incredible creatures to convey a grand coming of age narrative. While told against a backdrop fantastical surroundings, it is one of loss and redemption, and one we all can relate to.

discriptive imagination
Curse of the Tahiera tells a story like no other. Wendy Gillissen tells us a tale of vast lands and incredible creatures to convey a  grand coming of age narrative.  While told against a backdrop fantastical surroundings,  it is one of loss and redemption, and one we all can relate to.

The main characters are given such description that Gillissen gives no room for second guessing. We are told of the journey of Rom and Yldich, and through each trail and tribulation we are left cheering for our hero. In scenes told of moments rapt with tension we are stolen away into the moment as Gillissen tells us of their angst, beauty and triumph.  Discribing the raw power of the moment Wendy Gillissen words fill us.

As Rom travels the countryside he is met by infamous characters that aid or impede his journey. You are told about each person with such in depth knowledge that even for these seemingly secondary individuals it is outstanding.

Imagery sets this story apart by her meticulous ability to inform us of each detail.  She has created a whole new world and through her disclosure of this saga, we are transported there. Set with in a land tense with the possibility of battle her depiction of the conflict sucks you in and evokes a rush after each heart pounding moment.  You are told in a way that you can feel the horses breath on the back of your neck as you stand at the front lines awaiting the command to charge.

Curse of the Tahiera will leave you wanting. I cannot say enough about the intense word art that Gillissen interjects into each chapter, and her world comes alive with each stroke of her pen. You are introduced to each blade of grass and leaf on the tree. You feel a kin to the clothing, as well as the stitching technique used to make each garment. Conveying the feel of the earth beneath your feet, the smell of the flora, the taste of the air, and the sounds of your foot hitting the ground. By the end of the story not only have you been to the heart of her land, you are a resident.